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Cupertino Library Foundation In the News

Cupertino City Councilor Gilbert Wong awards City Proclamation to Cupertino Library Foundation President Eno Schmidt and Board Member Beverly LenihanThanks to your support, the Cupertino Library offers books, buildings…and more! Learn more about the Cupertino Library Foundation and our work to support the Cupertino Public Library and the local community.

This year promises new opportunities at programs sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation.

This is your opportunity to “be cool” and help underwrite these programs for life-long learning and self improvement initiatives through a donationConnected Community gift or planned giving honorarium to the Cupertino Library Foundation.

>> Click here to read press releases from the Cupertino Library Foundation.


Cupertino Library Foundation’s science and research contest is back for 5th year

By Kristi Myllenbeck, kmyllenbeck@community-newspapers.com

POSTED: 05/04/2016 06:03:26 PM PDT | UPDATED: ABOUT 15 HOURS AGO

Sixth- through eighth-graders in the Cupertino Union School District are being tasked with solving some of the nation’s most pressing issues.

No pressure, right?

The fifth annual S^4-Super Summer Science Search contest, held by the Cupertino Library Foundation, is asking participating students to choose a U.S. city and solve a problem related to energy, transportation, housing or a different challenge of their choice.

Registration for the free contest has begun and will close June 30. Participants have until July 30 at 11:59 p.m. to brainstorm, formulate, develop and finish their problem-solving research project.

Beverly Lenihan, vice president of the foundation, started the contest five years ago with a goal in mind.

“The Cupertino Library wanted to increase the awareness and use of their vast no-charge databases to junior high students,” she said. “We brainstormed ideas at our Cupertino Library Foundation meeting and decided teens love contests.”

The contest requires participants to conduct at least part of their research using the Santa Clara County Library District online databases.

Over the years, the contest has evolved to include a teen task force, which coaches students, holds study sessions and judges submissions.

Shail Trivedi, a senior at Monta Vista High School, has been participating in the task force for three years and said the experience is invaluable for middle schoolers.

“Having those skills early on–learning how to use a database, all that stuff–instead of learning it in high school, you can learn it in middle school and progress from there,” Shail said. “The S^4 contest can also be a build off to something like Intel Science Search.”

Shail also said that the contest question this year is challenging students to think outside the box.

“The biggest element of the contest is creativity and research, obviously, so those two elements are definitely present in all the prompts,” he said. “But this year is a little more open, I think. They are given a few categories to choose from, but under those, they can go whichever direction they want.”

Keerthi Krishnan, another task force member, said the contest requires a lot of work but is more than worth it for the experience.

“We require and we expect kids to develop a sense of responsibility, hard work, teamwork, and to instigate the creative side of their brains,” Keerthi said. “The kids learn how to collaborate, create ideas, execute ideas and create a leadership personality so that it takes them far when they go to high school.”

Keerthi added that high school is “completely different from middle school” and developing research skills now will help make the adjustment to high school smoother.

Submitted projects will go through three rounds of judging: a qualifying round, a judging round by the task force, then a final judging round by noted residents and representatives from companies like Apple, Google and Hewlett-Packard.

First-, second- and third-place individuals or teams will receive prizes. The first place prize is an iPad mini, second place is $100 and third place is $50. The top 15 project individuals or teams and their families will be invited to a reception in August to receive certificates.

For the last three years the contest has been funded by the Peter Likhachev Foundation, according to contest administrator Pam Marino.

The teen task force is holding five study sessions during the contest to help participants with their projects, the first of which will be May 7 at 3 p.m. All interested participants are encouraged to attend. All sessions will be at Cupertino Community Hall, 10350 Torre Ave.

For more information about the contest and study sessions, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation.org.


Cupertino: Teens asked to tackle traffic with mayor’s contest

By Kristi Myllenbeck – San Jose Mercury News

Cupertino Mayor Barry Chang is challenging residents ages 13-19 to come up with a solution to traffic in the Silicon Valley. In “Solve the Streets” as the contest is named, Mayor Chang challenges teens to “take on the role of a policy maker” and look at traffic in the area, research ways to improve traffic, and create a 5-10 minute video explaining the proposed traffic and transportation solutions.

The first place winner will get $300, second place will get $200 and third place $100 and all winners will be recognized by Chang at an award ceremony. The deadline to apply is Jan. 17.

For more information about the Solve the Streets contest and to enter, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation.org/cupertino-teens-video-contest


Star Trek event beams into Cupertino this weekend

Trekkies in the South Bay are in for a treat.

The third annual “Star Trek, The Future, and You!” event will take place in Cupertino on Dec. 12 and 13.

The event will feature three guest speakers: Sean Kenney, who played Captain Pike in the original series pilot; Gary Lockwood, who was in an episode of the original series and played the part of Dr. Frank Poole in “2001: A Space Odyssey”; and Marc Cushman, an author and television historian.

BlueLight Cinemas CEO Art Cohen said the two-day event is a combined effort.

“What’s really neat about this event is it’s a coalition of multiple organizations within Cupertino,” Cohen said. “It’s a sponsorship by the Cupertino Library Foundation, it’s a sponsorship by the Cupertino Library itself and BlueLight Cinemas, and this year we’re partnering with Cupertino Hotel.”

The first event on Dec. 12 will be a meet-and-greet with the three guest speakers at the Cupertino Hotel from 5:30 to 7 p.m., with hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine.

The Dec. 13 event is more family-centered and will take place at BlueLight Cinemas from 1 to 3:30 p.m. The theater will screen a video about the actors, followed by a question-and-answer session with them.

All of the events are free, but Cohen recommends bringing cash because often, actors will charge a small fee for signatures and photos.

The 50 year anniversary of “Star Trek” is next year, and Cohen considers this event as one of the first celebrations of the milestone. He added that the event is particularly special because of the concentration of Trekkies in the area and because of the inspiration that comes from science fiction.


Local teens take over library for night of hacking, engineering

By Matt Wilson for the San Jose Mercury News

The Cupertino Library is planning an ambitious overnight event aimed at putting local teens’ engineering, robotics construction and computer programming skills to the test.

The library along with its foundation are organizing CU HACKS, a tech-centric campout of sorts that will see high school and early college age residents compete at the library on Torre Ave. from 5 p.m. on June 20 through the morning of June 21.

The Cupertino Library is presenting this event with support from the Cupertino Library Foundation.

Hackers will be given a roughly 13-hour window to combine their critical thinking, technical planning and coding development skills to produce applications directly relating to a specific prompt.

The catch? Participants will not know the prompt until the very beginning of the event, according to organizers.

“CU HACKS provides a unique collaborative and learning opportunity to high school students,” says Gayathri Kanth, Cupertino community librarian.

The free event is limited to 150 teenagers ages 14-19. Teens can register through the library’s website. A blog detailing the particulars of CU HACKS was expected to be on the website by press time.

Kanth says that goals of the event are to give teens an opportunity for personal growth, boost design and coding skills, collaborate with groups, design projects with a community benefit and encourage girls to participate.

Throughout the night, a variety of mentor-led instructional workshops will be held to assist participants of all skill levels. Event organizers say all attendees will exit the event having learned new programing techniques and skills.

“CU HACKS is an innovative program that establishes the library as a place that engages teens in creating projects that make a positive impact on the lives of teens in the Cupertino community,” says Eno Schmidt, president of the Cupertino Library Foundation.

Participants can forms teams of up to four people or go it alone. Attendees should bring their laptop, a phone, chargers and any other nighttime necessities. Food and refreshments will be provided.

CU HACKS will also be an opportunity for young techies to network with and learn from like-minded teens, tech innovators and experienced mentors.

Participants will be restricted to second floor for much of the night, but library staff will be available to process new library cards and check out materials. Attendees must stay inside the library for the entire duration of the hack-a-thon.

The genesis for CU HACKS came from a number of sources including Kanth, teen librarian adviser Matt Lorenzo and the library’s teen advisory board. Library commissioner and library foundation member Jerry Liu also expressed interest in helping with a hack-a-thon, Kanth says.

Guest judges will assess and score each hack-a-thon project based on its originality, technical difficulty, user experience and applicability. The top two finalists in each of five categories will then pitch their projects to a panel of judges, explaining their application’s relevancy and effectiveness. Prizes will be awarded in each category.

In addition to workshops and presentations, CU HACKS will also include dinner, demonstrations, a Jenga tournament and breakfast.

The event is also part of the Santa Clara County Library District’s Teen Summer Reading Challenge. CU HACKS is open to teens from all cities and schools. A library district card is not required to participate.

For more information about the event, visit cuhacks.org and sccl.org/Locations/Cupertino. For more information about the Cupertino Library Foundation, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation.org.


Nichelle Nichols, other ‘Trek’ figures to appear at Cupertino theater

By Crystal Chowcchow for the San Jose Mercury News

Even if Nichelle Nichols had never troubled with tribbles or kissed James T. Kirk on “Star Trek,” she would be famous. Before joining the original crew of the USS Enterprise, Nichols sang in the orchestras of Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton. She also worked in musical theater. As communications officer Nyota Uhura, however, awareness of her talent shot into warp drive. In 1966, when she first appeared in “Star Trek,” Nichols ventured where no African-American woman had gone before: as a non-stereotypical TV character on full equal footing with her male counterparts.

Since then, Nichols has embraced her iconic status and the sci-fi show’s fans in particular. “I love being around them. I love their madness and their caring,” she has said. So much so that she will appear next month at what amounts to a micro-mini “Trek” convention taking place in Cupertino.

Nichols will be part of “Star Trek: the Future and You!” on Dec. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at BlueLight Cinemas, the discount-movie theater. Joining her will be Sean Kenney, who guest-starred as Capt. Christopher Pike in the original series, and Marc Cushman, author of “These are the Voyages – TOS: Season One.”

The event, co-sponsored by BlueLight Cinemas, the Cupertino Library and the Cupertino Library Foundation, will consist of a video presentation of various “Star Trek” scenes and a Q&A session. Afterward, the trio will autograph books (Nichols and Kenney are also authors) and memorabilia.

Nichols wrote “Beyond Uhura: Star Trek and Other Memories” and the novel “Saturn’s Child”; Kenney’s book is titled “Captain Pike Found Alive!” Works by all three participants will be available for purchase.

BlueLight Cinemas is at 21275 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino. The event is free, but reservations for the video show and Q&A session must be made at cupertinolibraryfoundation.org. Seating is extremely limited. No reservations are necessary for the signings.

Credit for this South Bay coup goes to Art Cohen, CEO of BlueLight. A board member of the Cupertino Library Foundation, Cohen hosted an appearance last year with Kenney, the man forever known as the ill-fated Pike, predecessor to Kirk himself.

Kenney had so much fun he wanted to make a repeat visit, and Cohen was agreeable so long as something new could be featured. “This only started coming together in late October,” he says of the BlueLight special. The addition of Cushman, and especially Nichols, suddenly made the Cupertino gathering a real fan fest. (By the way, attendees should be sure to wish the actress an early happy birthday. The still-sultry star turns 82 on Dec. 28.)

“The theme will focus not only on the nostalgia of the original ‘Star Trek,’ but also on how ‘Star Trek’ has influenced technology development here in the heart of Silicon Valley,” Cohen says.

Consider it a warm-up for an “official” “Star Trek” Convention taking place Dec. 12-14 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Burlingame. Kenney will be there, as will George Takei, another original alum. Information can be found at creationent.com. Beam yourselves up.


Cupertino Library Celebrates 10th Anniversary October 18th

Ding Ding TV

The Cupertino Library announces their official 10th anniversary celebration of its most recent Library in Cupertino Saturday, October 18th, next to Community Hall. The one-day celebration will be a free, fair-style event with interactive opportunities for all ages. The Santa Clara County Library District, City of Cupertino, Library Commission, Library Foundation, Friends of Cupertino Library and many community groups are joining forces to create and fund a fun and memorable event around the theme ‘Gateway to Learning.’

To highlight the celebration, and this season of gratitude,the Cupertino Library Foundation has kicked off a #LoveYour Library campaign.Community members are sharing their love of the Cupertino Library by sharing#UNSelfie photos with books poised on their heads and signs showing they#LoveYourLibrary. Over 80,000 items are checked out of the Cupertino Library weekly, and many more resources are accessed online, at no cost with a library card.

“These #LoveYourLibrary photos are fun, and the campaign is spreading quickly through social media,” said Gayathri Kanth, Cupertino community librarian. “Library patrons are donating to the Cupertino Library Foundation #LoveYourLibrary #GivingTuesday #UNSelfie campaign. It’s nice to know people are having fun and supporting the many Library programs that the Cupertino Library Foundation helps fund throughout the year.”

Saturday, October 18th is the day for community celebration of the Library’s 10th anniversary. The official ceremony begins with a brief program at 11:30 am, emceed by Mayor Gilbert Wong. The booths and entertainment will begin just following the ceremony and continue until 4 pm. At 3:30 a special ceremony to close and bury the time capsule will take place in the Library courtyard. This event is being organized by the Teen Advisory Board, under the direction of Teen Services Librarian, Matt Lorenzo.This is also free and open to the public.

More than 20 booths and entertainment options, plus food trucks, are planned around a unique approach to the Dewey Decimal System (DDS).Subjects as far reaching as astrology (predict the future of libraries) to financial health (put on by members of the Chamber), Frisbee art (made possible by the Library Foundation) and high-school robotics demonstrations will keep children, teens and adults entertained throughout the afternoon. Activities will be staged throughout the Library and Community Hall. A cricket demonstration will be in the field. Entertainment and community booths will be in the City Hall plaza.

“The Cupertino Library is one of our greatest success stories in our 100 years as a district,” said Nancy Howe, Santa Clara County District librarian. “The Library has more than 330,000 volumes in its collection,circulates more than 2.5 million items annually and welcomes over 850,000 visitors annually.”

The access to the online resources increases dramatically as well. The S^4 summer science contest, sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation, the Library and the Cupertino Union School District, introduced hundreds of middle school students to the online databases that encourage primary research and critical thinking. The new Common Core Standards encourage these life-long skills.


Popular Cupertino Library to toast facility’s 10th anniversary

San Jose Mercury News
By Matt Wilson, October 8, 2014

The Cupertino Library is having its 10th birthday party, and the community that has made the library a smashing success the past decade is invited to celebrate.

Multiple community library and community organizations are banding together for a “gateway to learning” festival set for Oct. 18 from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Cupertino Civic Center and library, 10800 Torre Ave.

The event will be a celebration of not only the library itself, but also of its role as a major hub of activity in the Cupertino community.

“The Cupertino Library is one of our greatest success stories in our 100 years as a district,” Nancy Howe, county librarian for the Santa Clara County Library District, said in a press statement. “The library has more than 330,000 volumes in its collection, circulates more than 2.5 million items annually and welcomes over 850,000 visitors annually.”

The library’s astounding popularity has led to an average of more than 80,000 items checked out or accessed online in a given week, according to the Cupertino Library Foundation.

The admission-free festival is a joint venture of the Santa Clara County Library District, city of Cupertino, Cupertino Library Commission, Cupertino Library Foundation, Friends of the Cupertino Library and other community groups.

The civic center will transform into a festival with activities for all ages, and will feature informational booths, entertainment, and interactive activities, according to event organizers.

The morning activities will include an official celebration ceremony emceed by Cupertino Mayor Gilbert Wong at 11:30 a.m. The booths and live entertainment will begin shortly thereafter and continue through 4 p.m. At 3:30 p.m., the library’s teen advisory board will bury a time capsule in the library’s courtyard.

More than 20 booths will be on site along with food trucks. Attendees can also try out Dewey Decimal System-themed games, theorize about the future of libraries at an astrology booth, make Frisbee art, see a high school robotics demonstration, get a financial health update from Cupertino Chamber of Commerce members and see a cricket demonstration at Library Field.

The event also ties in with the Santa Clara County Library District’s 100th anniversary. The original county library was first housed in the city of San Jose’s Hall of Justice in 1914. The little library was staffed by librarian Stella Huntington and featured a single typewriter, a dictionary, two chairs and a library collection of just 6,127 books, according to the district.

Today, the district has a network of eight libraries and two bookmobiles, offering more than 1.9 million items to the more than 400,000 residents living within the district’s cities of Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill, and Saratoga. The district also serves the unincorporated areas of Santa Clara County.

#LoveYourLibrary

As part of the 10th anniversary celebration, the Cupertino Library Foundation has kicked off a #LoveYourLibrary campaign.. The foundation is inviting members of the Cupertino community to share “their love of the Cupertino Library” by taking photographs with a book on their head and holding a sign explaining why they love their library, according to campaign organizers.

Photos can then be shared by way of social media in the style of a selfie.

“These #LoveYourLibrary photos are fun, and the campaign is spreading quickly through social media,” Cupertino community librarian Gayathri Kanth said in a press statement. “Library patrons are donating to the Cupertino Library Foundation #LoveYourLibrary #GivingTuesday #UNSelfie campaign.

“It’s nice to know people are having fun and supporting the many library programs that the Cupertino Library Foundation helps fund throughout the year.”

For more information about upcoming library events, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation.org.


Cupertino Union students win iPad, cash for summer science projects

San Jose Mercury News
By Matt Wilson
 August 20, 2014 

How did you spend your summer vacation?

Five local Cupertino Union School District students have been honored with cold, hard cash for their scientific studies this summer in the Super Summer Science Search contest. The brainy competition put on by the Cupertino Library Foundation is in its third year and sees students use resources from the Santa Clara County Library District’s databases to unearth knowledge about music, the arts, medicine and technology.

First place went to Kennedy Middle School seventh-grader Ashvin Irrinki for his work studying the ventriculoperitoneal shunt, a device implanted in the human body to help drain excess cerebrospinal fluid from the cavities called ventricles, located in the brain. The shunt is used to help treat a medical condition called hydrocephalus, a condition in which there is too much accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles caused by hemorrhages, head trauma and birth defects.

“It feels great,” Ashvin says of his first-place finish. “I wasn’t really expecting it. I just wanted to try and do my best.”

Second place went to the team of Gautham Gujjula and Rithin Venkatesh for their study of ASIMO, the humanoid robot. ASIMO, short for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility, is a fully mobile assistant for offices, schools and physically impaired people. It is still in testing and development, and the student-led team theorized different ways to improve the robot for wider-spread consumer use in the future.

Third place went to Mythili Bhethanabotla and Susan Zhou for their project titled “Monet Not Money: Art Forgery,” which centered on using science to detect bogus works of art. The team put together a nearly five-minute YouTube video skit that explained Morellian analysis and how X-rays and white lead dating could be used to spot a forgery.

Students from any of the five Cupertino Union School District middle schools were eligible for the contest. The S^4 contest saw 118 entries and 47 teams.

“The teen and adult judges were amazed by the quality and depth of the entries,” Bev Lenihan, Cupertino Library Foundation board member and project director, said in a press release. “The videos were exceptional, and the journals gave insight to their fascinating lives and personalities.”

The Cupertino Library Foundation held six study sessions throughout the spring and summer for students to work on their projects. Assistance came from local high school students.

Each entry by either an individual, or a team of up to three, had to submit a report, a journal, their research citations and a presentation. Winning teams did short presentations at a celebration Aug. 16.

The first-place winner received an iPad mini. Each member of the second-place team received $100, and each member of the third-place team received $50.

Contest judging took place in three flights consisting of S^4 organizers, local teens and technology professionals from high-tech giants such as Apple, Google and Hewlett-Packard.

There was no cost to enter the contest. A grant from the Peter Likhachev Foundation helped finance this year’s S^4 competition. The library foundation is looking into making the program portable to other library entities who want to run similar contests.

“This was a very fun experience and very educational,” says Mythili, 13, an incoming Lynbrook High School student. “You can learn a lot about something you are interested in.”

Rithin, a 14-year-old incoming Monta Vista student, added, “Competitions like this encourage us to research and learn about something that might change the lives of many people.”

For more information about S^4 and to view documents and videos associated with winning entries, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation.org.


Santa Clara County Library District Receives Top Innovator Award of 2014

The Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD) has been recognized by the Urban Libraries Council (ULC) as one of its Top Innovators of 2014. This award recognizes SCCLD’s partnership with Silicon Valley start-up company, JukePop, Inc., that revives the lost art of episodic–fiction and introduces a new service to library patrons that provides free access to self-published e-books.

The Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD) has been recognized by the Urban Libraries Council (ULC) as one of its Top Innovators of 2014. SCCLD was presented with the top award in the “Collections” category at the NEXT Library Conference in Chicago. This award recognizes SCCLD’s partnership with Silicon Valley start-up company, JukePop, Inc., that revives the lost art of episodic–fiction and introduces a new service to library patrons that provides free access to self-published e-books.

The Santa Clara County Library District’s project was selected by a panel of expert judges from more than 180 ULC Innovations Initiative applications. Top Innovator Awards honor organizations who demonstrate creative new approaches and practices which ensure public libraries continue to meet expanding community needs. Twenty-two libraries from around the country were recognized in ten different award categories for their innovative programs, services, and operating practices.

“We are honored to receive this award from the Urban Libraries Council,” commented Jason Baker, Campbell City Council Member and Chair of the Santa Clara County Library District Joint Powers Authority (JPA) Board. “By joining forces with JukePop, Inc., our libraries are now able to provide free access to stories written by talented up-and-coming self-published authors.”

“Our partnership with SCCLD provides the public with easy access to over 1,100 free, online self-published serial novels in an e-book format. Self-published authors now have a viable platform to showcase their stories, chapter by chapter, building readership and gathering feedback,” said Jerry Fan, Founder and CEO of JukePop, Inc.

All self-published content is first curated by JukePop, Inc. and then further refined by librarians before final selections are offered for free on the SCCLD website: http://www.sccl.org/episodic-fiction. A library card is not required to view the content.


Cupertino teens cultivate garden at library, donate vegetables to pantry

San Jose Mercury News
Article by Matt Wilson
July 9, 2014

Sandya Manickam, 16, and Cindy Deng, 16, show off the Cupertino Library’s teen garden. The library’s Teen Services has successfully completed its first year of running the Green Teen Volunteer Garden program. More than 30 teens have participated in creating a self-contained garden in the courtyard.

Creating a thriving garden is now one of the many learning resources for teens at the Cupertino Library.

For just over a year, the library courtyard has been home to a garden that is entirely maintained and cared for by teens from local schools. To date, the Green Teen Volunteer Garden program has seen more than 30 teens work together to grow tasty organic vegetables that are delivered to West Valley community Services’ food pantry.

The garden is designed to provide local teenagers with hands-on experience in growing vegetation while teaching them the skills needed to care for and nurture an outdoor garden.

The garden was designed by the library’s teen advisory board and with oversight by teen services librarian Matt Lorenzo.

“This teaches them some hands-on learning experience and gives them an opportunity to get their hands dirty and learn a new skill they can take with them throughout life,” says Lorenzo.

Teens gain knowledge about the needs of different plants and the environmental factors that may affect their growth. The volunteers work to water plants, clip leaves and monitor soil levels. They also keep a close watch to ensure that all plants are in healthy condition.

Teens take turns caring for the garden Tuesday through Saturday from about 4 to 6 p.m. Two or three teens will come out and water the plants, check on their progress, and pick the good ones. Deliveries are done periodically and taken over to West Valley Community Services’ food pantry
personally by the teens.

The first year saw 32 pounds of vegetables taken over to the nonprofit on Vista Drive. The teens are able to see firsthand how their work in the garden makes an impact on other people.

“This is an experience where we can see what community service is really all about,” says Sandya Manickam, a 16-year-old volunteer who will be a senior at Cupertino High School in the fall.

The garden has been up and running for 15 months. The garden came out of some brainstorming ideas from teen volunteers and a need for some added life to the library courtyard. “The courtyard was looking desolate, worth not a lot of plant life. It was very barren,” says Lorenzo.

The teens needed to deliver a proposal to library officials, a process that took nearly half a year. Funding for the garden comes from the Friends of the Cupertino Library. The garden received help getting off the ground with donations from Kellogg’s Garden Supply and Yamagami’s Nursery in Cupertino, who donated and delivered soil and supplies.

“It feels great to see something as tiny as a seed turn into a big lettuce. It’s kind of metaphorical; this idea started small and expanded. It is blossoming and becoming a much bigger project,” says Cindy Deng, a 16-year-old garden volunteer and student going into the 11th grade at Homestead High School.

Small children even come over to the garden and ask teen volunteers questions about the plants and the work being done. The success of the teen garden spawned an adjacent children’s garden, which is maintained by two librarians on staff. The garden is used for story time and other educational events.

The Master Gardeners of Santa Clara County also collaborate with the teen program by holding ongoing tutorials with the teen volunteers in which they learn about vegetation care, irrigation, composting, soil rotation and harvesting.

Opportunities to volunteer and work in the garden are open to local teams who inquire at the library. A recent June 28 orientation saw 15 new teens join the program, according to Lorenzo.

For more information about teen volunteer opportunities, visit cupertinolibrary.org.


Library group receives $20,000 for programs

San Jose Mercury News
May 28, 2014

The Cupertino Library Foundation announced this month that it has received close to $20,000 in grants and donations in the second quarter of this year to support its programs and initiatives.

The Peter Likhachev Foundation alone granted the foundation $10,000 to support its third annual S^4-Super Summer Science Search Contest, open to any middle school student in the Cupertino community with a focus on public schools in Cupertino and private schools in the area. Students who will be outgoing sixth- through eighth-graders this June are eligible.

Students can get more information and register for the contest beginning June 1 on the foundation website, cupertinolibraryfoundation.org. Application entries are due no later than midnight on Aug. 1.


Thank You Safeway for Donating to the Cupertino Library Foundation!

By Matt Wilson mwilson@community-newspapers.com Posted on May 7, 2014

Representatives of the Cupertino Library Foundation Board, Bob Adams and Bev Lenihan, accept a $2,500 grant from Safeway Foundation
Representatives of the Cupertino Library Foundation Board, Bob Adams and Bev Lenihan, accept a $2,500 grant from Safeway Foundation at the grand opening
of Safeway’s mega-store in Cupertino May 1st. The Cupertino Library Foundation was recommended by the Cupertino Chamber of Commerce for its
focus on enriching programs and services for the Cupertino Library and the community.

After years of anticipation, Safeway has finally opened at the Homestead Square Shopping Center. The store, at 20620 Homestead Road, held a soft opening May 1 and opened its doors officially May 2 at 8 a.m.

The 55,000-square-foot store is open 24 hours and boasts familiar Safeway amenities, including a bakery, deli, pharmacy and floral, produce, meat, seafood and wine sections. The store also boasts a Signature Cafe and Starbucks. Unique to the store are more Asian, Indian and organic items, as well as 300 different choices of cheese, according to store management.

“It’s a great match,” said Wendy Gutshall, Safeway spokeswoman. “It’s our first store in Cupertino, and we are very happy to be here. It has great proximity to surrounding businesses and De Anza College.”


The May 1 soft opening also featured the Safeway Foundation donating $2,500 to the Cupertino Library Foundation.

Cupertino Library FoundationSafeway officials, store management and Cupertino Mayor Gilbert Wong offered a few remarks. Safeway will fill a recent shopping void in the city.

Cupertino has been left without a traditional large-scale supermarket in the city limits since the PW Market saw all of its chains close in August 2010 and the Lucky on De Anza Boulevard closed in 2012. The Lucky site is now home to a 99 Ranch Market.

The new Safeway could also be the new go-to shopping destination for some residents in southern Sunnyvale. According to the Sunnyvale city manager’s April 7 blog, the Safeway store on Hollenbeck Avenue is scheduled to close in early summer, leaving Sunnyvale with three Safeway stores, all of which are located on El Camino Real. Homestead Square Shopping Center is located at the southwest corner of De Anza Boulevard and Homestead Road.

The center is wrapping up its first renovation in 40 years, which began in 2010. When the makeover was pitched to Cupertino elected officials, developers from Sobrato Organization planned to knock down more than 95,000 square feet of space to build up 147,709 square feet for its tenants, including four new commercial satellite buildings and three new major tenant spaces.

Safeway now anchors the middle of the shopping center, with a new-look Michaels arts and crafts store nearby. A new Rite Aid was also constructed on the site and sits along Homestead Road. The former T.J. Maxx at the center moved into the old Mervyn’s building at the Cupertino Crossroads Shopping Center in spring 2012.


3D Library Event

San Jose Mercury News By Matt Wilson
Posted: April 2, 2014

The Cupertino Library Foundation and the Cupertino Library are debuting their “Fusion: Art. Science. Technology” series April 12 at Cupertino Community Hall, 10350 Torre Ave.   The free event will be from 1 to 3 p.m. The first seminar, with speaker Geoffrey Doyle, will highlight the history of 3D printing, types of technology, and how it is changing lives.

Doyle is CEO of GrowShapes LLC, which provides 3D printing and scanning products and services in Silicon Valley. He began his career in the British Army, and moved into venture capital and worked at Percipient Capital in London for more than 10 years, investing in UK technology companies, according to the library foundation.   After moving to Silicon Valley, he established SVForum’s 3D Printing and Scanning Special Interest Group at the beginning of 2013, the first monthly meeting forum for 3D printing-related technology in Silicon Valley.

He is also a business adviser to Silicon Valley companies, such as Sixense Entertainment, and a frequent speaker on the topic of 3D printing investments and technology trends.   A second seminar in the Fusion series will be June 21 and will explore the shift in the 3D printing industry from engineers to hobbyists and young, budding engineers who want to create their own advance prototypes. The speaker will be entrepreneur and inventor Robert Bigler.


Silicon Valley Reads closes this weekend with Cupertino event

San Jose Mercury News By Sal Pizarro
Posted: March 24, 2014

It’s hard to believe that another Silicon Valley Reads season has come and gone. After dozens of author events, children’s storytimes, special panels and even an art exhibit, the community reading program has its closing event Sunday at the Cupertino Community Hall.

This year’s topic was “Books and Technology: Friends or Foes?” It should be interesting to hear if the authors of the program’s two main books, “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore” by Robin Sloan and “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains” by Nicholas Carr, think the past two months of activities have uncovered any answers.   I

n addition to both authors returning to Silicon Valley to talk with De Anza College President Brian Murphy, the 1:30 p.m. program will include the announcement of the winners of the Cupertino Library Foundation’s essay and poetry contests. Forty-three adults and teens entered the essay contest, which was the most entries in the contest’s six years, and there were 50 entries for the first year of the poetry contest.

For more information on this year’s Silicon Valley Reads program — produced by the San Jose Public Library Foundation, the Santa Clara County Library District and the Santa Clara County Office of Education — go to www.siliconvalleyreads.org.


Cupertino Library Foundation announces winners of S3 science competition

San Jose Mercury News By Matt Wilson Posted: August 21, 2013 Spending a summer thinking about science and research? Not unusual in Cupertino.   Last week, the Cupertino Library Foundation announced winners in the second annual S3-Super Science Searches summer contest for Cupertino Union School District middle school students. The contest saw students spend a part of their summer doing some scientific research and some serious critical thinking.

(photo Matt Wilson/Cupertino Courier) Winners in the S3-Super Science Searches summer contest receive their prizes and awards from Bev Lenihan, S3 project manager and Cupertino Library Foundation board member, during a reception Aug. 16 at the library. The contest challenged students to do scientific research and critical thinking over the summer.
(photo Matt Wilson/Cupertino Courier) Winners in the S3-Super Science Searches summer contest receive their prizes and awards from Bev Lenihan, S3 project manager and Cupertino Library Foundation board member, during a reception Aug. 16 at the library. The contest challenged students to do scientific research and critical thinking over the summer.

First-place winners were the team of Alexander Ivanov and Rajiv Nelakanti, both incoming eighth-graders at Cupertino Middle School. They each received Apple iPad Minis. Second place went to Niyati Sriram, an outgoing eighth-grader from Cupertino Middle School, who received $100 cash. Third place and $50 cash went to Shivalika Chavan, an outgoing eighth-grader from Kennedy Middle School.

Contest organizers from the foundation were inundated with submissions. There were 206 registrants and 63 official entrants.

“This second year was quite an uptick in registrations,” said Eno Schmidt, president of the Cupertino Library Foundation and a contest judge. “We found getting the word about the contest directly to the parents really increased the response rate.

This annual community activity not only gave the students a focus for the summer, it also is helping prepare them for the Common Core Standards in 2014.”   The contest gets middle school students ready to do research and teachers them how to use the Santa Clara County Library District’s online databases. Students were required to research and discuss three recent technological advances, and then to create their own technological advancement and describe its pros and cons.

The project was quite thorough. Students were required to write a written paper, a blog or journal, record their citings, recommend 10 questions to be asked of a person wanting to put forth a technological advancement and to make a presentation or video.

“I was amazed at the creativity in many of the presentations,” said Bev Lenihan, S3 project manager and Cupertino Library Foundation board member. “These students are using tools like EZBib, Prezzi and blog formats brand-new to them. They just dove in and learned them. I love their enthusiasm.”

Plenty of eyes looked over the submissions. Teen and adult judges from Hewlett-Packard, Apple Inc., the Cupertino Union School District, NASA Ames and the library foundation combed through the projects and helped narrow down the pool of potential winners.

Organizers held a celebration and awards ceremony to present winners their prizes on Aug. 16 in the Cupertino Library courtyard. Judges, members of the library foundation, members of the Cupertino Library Teen Advisory Board and library staff attended to congratulate the students.   For more information, visit cupertinolibraryfoundation .org.


Cupertino Library Foundation Announces S3-Super Science Searches Contest Winners

DingDingTV.com Posted: August 17, 2013 The Cupertino Library Foundation announced the winners of their second annual S3-Super Science Searches Summer Contest for Cupertino Union School District middle-school students. First Place-each receiving Apple iPad Minis are the team of Alexander Ivanov and Rajiv Nelakanti, both out-going 7th graders of Cupertino Middle School. Second Place-receiving $100 cash is Niyati Sriram, an out-going 8th grader from Cupertino Middle School; and Third Place-receiving $50 cash is Shivalika Chavan, an out-going 8th grader from Kennedy Middle School. There were 206 registrants, and 63 official entrants, many of them teams.

Eno Schmidt, President of the Cupertino Library Foundation, assists in judging the student entries in the S3 Super Science Searches 2013 Summer Contest.
Eno Schmidt, President of the Cupertino Library Foundation, assists in judging the student entries in the S3 Super Science Searches 2013 Summer Contest.

“This second year was quite an uptick in registrations,” said Eno Schmidt, president of the Cupertino Library Foundation. “We found getting the word about the contest directly to the parents really increased the response rate. This annual community activity not only gave the students a focus for the summer, it also is helping prepare them for the Common Core Standards in 2014.”

The structure of the contest is designed to assist middle-school students in doing primary research and learning how to access the Santa Clara County Library District’s online databases. Critical thinking skills are enhanced, as well as their writing and presentation skills, and learning to work in a team. This year’s contest parameters required the students to research and discuss three recent technological advances, and then to create their own technological advancement and describe its pros and cons.

The students were required to do a written paper, no more than five pages in length; a blog or journal; record their citings; recommend ten questions to be asked of a person wanting to put forth a technological advancement and to furnish a presentation and/or video.

“I was amazed at the creativity in many of the presentations,” said Bev Lenihan, S3 project manager and Cupertino Library Foundation Board member. “These students are using tools like EZBib, Prezzi, and blog formats brand new to them. They just dove in and learned them. I love their enthusiasm.”

The teen judges who volunteered for three days on Round 1: Ardak, Shreya, Elizabeth and Cindy. Adult judges for Friday were Jerry Liu and Rares Vernica from HP. The final judges were: Jason Lundgaard and Cory Williamson, from Apple; Mary Enright, newly named Coordinator of Instruction for Science and Mathematics for Cupertino Union School District; Rose Grymes, Sr. Scientist at Nasa Ames and Board Member of the Cupertino Library Foundation; Steve Fitzgerald, Manager, Adult and Teen Librarian at Cupertino Library; and Eno Schmidt, President of the Board of the Cupertino Library Foundation. Matt Lorenzo, former Teen Librarian assisted throughout the planning.

A celebration and awards ceremony to present the prizes was held August 16th in the evening in the Cupertino Library courtyard. Judges, members of the Library Foundation Board and members of the Cupertino Library Teen Advisory Board, as well as Library staff were there to congratulate the students. Families joined in the fun. More than 70 joined in the celebration.

“Our Cupertino students continue to amaze me,” said Orrin Mahoney, mayor of Cupertino and member of the Cupertino Library Foundation Advisory Council. “This S3 contest demonstrates how a good number of teens are willing to extend their own school year by digging deep into researching projects they may be working on in real life as adults.”

The Cupertino Library Foundation is a non-profit committed to extending life-long learning and self-improvement for all ages in the greater Cupertino community. A recent ROI study conducted by Berk and Associates confirms that for every dollar spent on library services, at least $5 is returned in benefit to the community. Since 2003, the Cupertino Library Foundation has also raised over $600,000 for additional Library services and initiatives, including the new Library and a renovated Teen Room.


Cupertino Middle Schoolers Win Apple iPad Minis, Cash

Cupertino Patch By Bea Karnes (Editor) Posted: August 16, 2013 at 08:00 PM

This year's S3-Super Science Searches Summer Contest drew hundreds of entries.
This year’s S3-Super Science Searches Summer Contest drew hundreds of entries.

The students came out on top of a contest held by the Cupertino Library Foundation. Several Cupertino middle school students have taken home nifty prizes for their efforts in a summer contest sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation.

The S3-Super Science Searches Summer Contest is designed to assist middle-school students in doing primary research and learning how to access the Santa Clara County Library District’s online databases.

“This second year was quite an uptick in registrations,” said Eno Schmidt, president of the Cupertino Library Foundation. “We found getting the word about the contest directly to the parents really increased the response rate. This annual community activity not only gave the students a focus for the summer, it also is helping prepare them for the Common Core Standards in 2014.”

So who took home the loot?

  • First Place-each receiving Apple iPad Minis are the team of Alexander Ivanov and Rajiv Nelakanti, both out-going 7th graders of Cupertino Middle School.
  • Second Place-receiving $100 cash is Niyati Sriram, an out-going 8th grader from Cupertino Middle School
  • Third Place-receiving $50 cash is Shivalika Chavan, an out-going 8th grader from Kennedy Middle School.

“I was amazed at the creativity in many of the presentations,” said Bev Lenihan, S3 project manager and Cupertino Library Foundation Board member. “These students are using tools like EZBib, Prezzi, and blog formats brand new to them. They just dove in and learned them. I love their enthusiasm.” A celebration and awards ceremony to present the prizes was held Friday evening, Aug. 16.

“Our Cupertino students continue to amaze me,” said Orrin Mahoney, mayor of Cupertino and member of the Cupertino Library Foundation Advisory Council. “This S3 contest demonstrates how a good number of teens are willing to extend their own school year by digging deep into researching projects they may be working on in real life as adults.”

The Cupertino Library Foundation is a non-profit committed to extending life-long learning and self-improvement for all ages in the greater Cupertino community. Since 2003, the Cupertino Library Foundation has also raised over $600,000 for additional Library services and initiatives, including the new Library and a renovated Teen Room.


庫市S3科學賽 學生展創造力 市長驚喜

記者周喆/庫比蒂諾報導

WorldJournal.com Posted: August 17, 2013 庫比蒂諾圖書館基金會16日宣布第二屆年度S3超級科學研究比賽優勝者。這項比賽專為庫比蒂諾聯合學區的初中學生舉辦。 獲得今年比賽第一名為Alexander Ivanov和Rajiv Nelakanti組成的團隊。他們都是庫比蒂諾中學七年級學生,將獲iPad Mini獎品。第二名為庫比蒂諾中學八年級學生Niyati Sriram,獲100元獎金。第三名為甘迺迪中學八年級學生Shivalika Chavan。今年共有206人報名,63人入圍。 庫比蒂諾圖書館基金會總裁施密特(Eno Schmidt)表示,今年報名人數明顯增加,說明直接向家長宣傳比賽內容對增加參賽人數很有幫助。 比賽結構的設計是為了幫助初中學生從事科學研究,並學習使用聖他克拉拉縣圖書館的線上資料庫。他們的獨立思考能力、寫作技能、表現力和團隊合作能力都能得到加強。 今年的比賽要求學生研究並討論三項最近的科技發展,然後製作自己的科技實驗,並說明它的優缺點。 S3比賽專案經理,庫比蒂諾圖書館基金會理事萊妮罕(Bev Lenihan)對參賽者的創造力感到驚奇。她指出,這些學生能使用EZBib、Prezzi等工具去探究對他們來說全新的內容。他們非常投入,並從中學到東西。她為學生們的熱情而欣喜。 庫比蒂諾市長馬弘利(Orrin Mahoney)表示,庫比蒂諾的學生不斷讓他驚喜。這項比賽顯示有很多青少年願意擴展自己的學習範圍,深入研究日後可能從事的領域。


Cupertino Library’s Tech Toolbar up and running

By Matt Wilson mwilson@community-newspapers.com
Posted: 06/18/2013 04:36:26 PM PDT

The Cupertino Library’s Tech Toolbar is available four days a week to help residents tap into the library’s vast collection of online resources and e-books. Trained Tech Toolbar volunteers are on site on Mondays from 10 a.m. to noon, Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.

The custom-built bar went live in May. Devices at the bar include Apple iPads, iPad minis, Microsoft Surface, Amazon Kindle, Google Nexus, Sony eReader and Barnes & Noble Nook. The Tech Toolbar and its staff is brought to the community by the Santa Clara County Library District and the Cupertino Library Foundation.


Cupertino Library Foundation Sponsors Technological Advances Contest

CUSD middle-schoolers reap benefits of library online databases

JUNE 2, 2013 — CUPERTINO, CA—The Cupertino Library Foundation (CLF), and Cupertino Library, a member of the Santa Clara County  Library District, have again partnered with the Cupertino Union School District (CUSD) to introduce middle-school students to the Library’s online databases. The S3-Super Science Searches 2013 Summer Contest runs from June 15, through the Awards Ceremony that will occur August 16, 6:30-8pm at the Cupertino Library.

The contest is open to all outgoing 6th-8th grade students in the Cupertino Union School District. All submissions are due by August 1, 2013. “We expect even more teams to get involved this year,” said Bev Lenihan, Cupertino Library Foundation board member and project manager. “We encourage teams to work together on the project described on our foundation website. Much of the effort of the teen Library staff these past two years has been assisting students and teachers in getting library cards and learning more about the available databases.”

This year’s project to be addressed by the applicants involves addressing the advantages and disadvantages of recent technological advances. Each applicant/team will also furnish ten questions they would want to ask someone who thinks she or he has the next best technological advance. A judging panel of teens and adults will review all submissions and decide first, second and third place. The first place team wins up to three iPad minis (one per team member); the second place team wins $100 each for up to four participants; the third place team wins $50 each for up to four participants. Awards will be given at a reception August 16th.

“We anticipate some thought-provoking student-generated research resulting in detailed papers, demonstrations and presentations,” said teen librarian Matthew Lorenzo. Learning to express ideas effectively is one of the key outcomes desired. Postings of journal entries, research citings, and presentations will be made via online postings to LiveBinders.com.

To organize this year’s contest effort, the Cupertino Library Foundation board again committed sufficient financial and volunteer resources. Project manager, Bev Lenihan, brought together an Ad Hoc committee consisting of one of last year’s winners, Elizabeth Wang; a member of the Library Teen Advisory Board, Ardak Askhatova; two volunteers, Nikita Devdhar and Rehan Ahmed; and Keith Kitchen, president of the Board of CEEF (Cupertino Educational Endowment Foundation); and Mary Enright, Science Teacher at Cupertino Middle School. Jeremy Nishihara, Community Relations manager for CUSD has facilitated the communication process.


Santa Clara County Library District, Cupertino Library, Cupertino Library Foundation Unveil First-Ever Tech Toolbar

The Tech Toolbar features the latest e-readers and tablets, and trained volunteers to answer questions about the devices and the Library’s extensive collection of e-books and digital resources.

APRIL 30, 2013 — CUPERTINO, CA—On Monday, May 6, visitors to the Cupertino Library will be able to try out the latest hand-held computer tablets and learn to access the vast digital resources the Santa Clara County Library District provides. The Tech Toolbar and its trained volunteer team are brought to the community by the Santa Clara County Library District, the Cupertino Library and the Cupertino Library Foundation. It is believed this approach to educating the public about these types of devices and library resources is unique in California.

“Think of it as a ‘genius bar on wheels’”, said Mark Fink, Cupertino community librarian. “We have a sleek portable display featuring the latest tablet computers and e-readers on the market today, and trained volunteers and staff to teach patrons how to use the devices.” Hours of volunteer coverage for the Tech Toolbar are: Monday, 10 a.m. – noon Wednesday, 6-8 p.m. Saturday/Sunday, 12-4 p.m.

The devices selected for the Tech Toolbar are compatible with the Library District’s extensive e-book collections. These devices include both the Apple iPad and iPad Mini, Microsoft Surface, the Kindle Paper White, the Barnes & Noble Nook, the Kindle Fire, the Google Nexus and the Sony eReader. Tech Toolbar volunteers will be able to show the public how to use computer tablets and e-readers available on the market today.

They have also received training to answer specific questions about accessing the Library District’s extensive e-book and digital content collections on different devices. For individuals who need more personalized assistance getting started with their tablets or e-readers, they can drop in or call the Adult/Teen Reference Desk at the Cupertino Library to schedule a 30 minute tutorial session with a librarian.

“The library is perfectly positioned to take the lead on creative ways to meet community needs. Through our helpful staff and volunteers, our patrons can learn about new technologies that are rapidly changing the way we access information,” said Nancy Howe, the County Librarian for the Santa Clara County Library District.

The Tech Toolbar came to life under the technical leadership of Megan Wong, the Library District’s Virtual Library Manager. “We wanted to be able to provide people with an option to try devices before they buy without the commercial overtones, and also to learn how to access digital library materials,” said Ms. Wong. “It’s truly enabling the community to have the library with them wherever they are.” For further information click here.


Cupertino Library Foundation Announces SV Stories-Video History Project

Reservations for participants now being taken for April 7th filming

March 6, 2013 by Bev Lenihan, Board Member Click here to download a PDF of this press release.

Click here for details about the 2013 Silicon Valley Video Histories Project. MARCH 6, 2013 — CUPERTINO, CA—On Sunday, April 7th, at Quinlan Community Center in Cupertino, video interviews will be conducted to capture the relevant stories of Silicon Valley, past and present. Reservations are now being accepted through http://www.sccl.org/node/506946

The Silicon Valley Stories Video History Project is gathering the memories and personal stories of local civic leaders and their families who have lived in Cupertino and the Santa Clara Valley. The goal of this project is to bring the past to life. These memories will serve as a source of information and entertainment for the community at large.

The Silicon Valley Stories Video History Project is made possible by the Santa Clara Valley History Collaborative, consisting of the Cupertino Library, the Cupertino Library Foundation, the Cupertino Historical Society and the California History Center at De Anza College. CreaTV will be filming the interviews. The interviews will last approximately 20 minutes.

“We are proud to record and archive the compelling stories of some of our most influential local residents,” said Mark Fink, Cupertino community librarian. “Through our collaborative partnership, we are able to offer this opportunity, free of charge, and are hopeful that this visual archive will benefit our community for years to come.”

Individuals who participate in the Video History Project will receive one free, unedited DVD copy of the interview that can be shared with family members and friends. DVDs will be mailed within 60 days after the event. In addition to the video interviews, Helene Davis of the Cupertino Historical Society, has pointed out that “stories…chosen from the archives of the CWA Collection, the California History Center (at Le Petit Trianon/De Anza College) and the Cupertino Historical Society….will be on display on the second floor of the Cupertino Library in the display case next to the CWA Collection through the end of June, 2013.” The display case features yearbook information for Steve Jobs as well as other local community movers and shakers. Click here for details about the 2013 Silicon Valley Video Histories Project


How Giving Became Cool

December 27, 2012 by Nicholas D. Kristof San Jose Mercury News It was 15 years ago that Ted Turner needed something interesting to say in a speech — and decided, in a rush, to give away $1 billion. “I was on my way to New York to make the speech,” Turner recalled to me. “I just thought, what am I going to say?” TED TURNER

So, in front of a stunned dinner audience, he announced a $1 billion gift to U.N. causes such as fighting global poverty. In nominal terms, before adjusting for inflation, that semiaccidental donation was, at the time, believed to be the biggest single gift ever made, and it has helped transform philanthropy.

Tycoons used to compete for their place on the Forbes and Fortune lists of wealthiest people. If they did give back, it was often late in life and involved museums or the arts. They spent far more philanthropic dollars on oil paintings of women than on improving the lives of real women.

Turner’s gift helped change that culture, reviving the tradition of great philanthropists like Rockefeller and Carnegie. Turner publicly began needling other billionaires — including Bill Gates and Warren Buffett — to be more generous. That was a breach of etiquette, but it worked. “It’s a starting point for me of this modern era of high-profile big public giving,” reflected Matthew Bishop, co-author of “Philanthrocapitalism,” a terrific book about how the business world is reshaping philanthropy.

“He called on others to step up, which did have a crystallizing effect on others. It allowed journalists and others who were talking to Bill Gates to say: ‘Why aren’t you giving more?'” Then they tormented Buffett with the same question. Ultimately, Gates and Buffett made huge contributions that are transforming the struggle against global disease and poverty. My hunch is that Gates will be remembered less for his work on personal computers than for his accomplishments against malaria, AIDS and poverty itself.

Gates and Buffett are both now recruiters for the Giving Pledge, which commits zillionaires to give away at least half their wealth. The giving pledge adds to the expectation that those who have won the global jackpot should give something back. Turner channeled his money through the United Nations Foundation, where it was leveraged to get other contributions so as to bring $2 billion to finance causes from malaria to polio, from climate change to family planning. The gift brought new respect to the United Nations and made it increasingly fashionable for billionaires to worry about global poverty.

These tycoons bring not just their checkbooks to the table but also a business sensibility that introduces greater rigor and evaluation to the world of bleeding hearts. All this has helped shine a greater spotlight on neglected issues — which, in turn, has led to extraordinary results. A study this month reported that infant mortality around the world dropped by more than half from 1990 to 2010. That’s millions of lives saved each year. Of course, not everybody has gotten the memo.

Take Donald Trump, who has contributed his name to a foundation but little more. An investigation by The Smoking Gun website described him as possibly “the least charitable billionaire in the United States,” for he apparently gave the foundation just $3.7 million — over 20 years. Trump, who has said he is worth $7 billion, is not even the largest contributor to his own foundation. (A spokesman for Trump suggested that it would be “totally incorrect” to characterize him as uncharitable, saying that he has also donated land in upstate New York for public parks and “millions of dollars” to other causes.)

Turner isn’t shy about encouraging others to jump on board. When I asked if he had any advice for my readers, he grew particularly animated: “You don’t have to have any money to make a difference; you can pick up trash walking down the street, and I do that all the time,” he said. “You can volunteer your time. You can be a big brother or a big sister.” Look, it makes me a little squeamish to extol a billionaire, for our society already has too much worship of the wealthy — and, in any case, the working poor in America are often more generous in percentage terms (and in volunteering) than those far better off.

That said, it warms my heart that a mogul donated $1 billion to enliven a speech, didn’t even put his name on the foundation and then let the money quietly save lives around the world. If you’re still reading, Donald Trump, it’s your move. Click to read the article online from the San Jose Mercury News  


Cupertino Library, Cupertino Library Foundation, Cupertino Historical Society, The Japanese American Museum of San Jose and the California History Center at De Anza College Announce their new collaborative exhibit:  “Moving Days: The Japanese American Experience in the Santa Clara Valley”


Santa Clara Valley History Collaborative Hosts Library Display and Events in 2012

AUGUST 1, 2012 — CUPERTINO, CA—The Cupertino Library, a member of the Santa Clara County Library District, the Cupertino Library Foundation (CLF), and the Cupertino Historical Society are kicking off their third Santa Clara Valley History Collaborative exhibit and program series.

The Collaborative is excited to be working with two new community partners – the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj) and the California History Center at De Anza College (CHC) to present  “Moving Days: The Japanese American Experience in the Santa Clara Valley.”

The exhibit will run through December 31, 2012 at the Cupertino Library. The purpose of the joint collaboration is to enhance and promote the historical richness of the Santa Clara Valley. Moving Days: Japanese American Experience in Silicon Valley sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation

“We are very grateful to the Japanese American Museum of San Jose for their generosity.  They have provided the Collaborative with access to a wealth of historical photographs, artifacts and artwork that poignantly portray several aspects of the lives of Japanese Americans in the Santa Clara Valley over the last 70 years,” notes Cupertino Community Librarian, Mark Fink. “We are fortunate to have the opportunity to bring this powerful and thought provoking exhibit and series of programs to the community. The Cupertino Library Foundation continues to be a catalyst in bringing us all together to share our resources.”

The kickoff event of “Moving Days” is scheduled for Sunday, September 30, 2012 from 1:30pm – 3:00pm with a public reception beginning at 12:45 in the Cupertino Community Hall located at 10350 Torre Ave. Cupertino, CA.  The public is invited to this free panel discussion entitled “Local Japanese Americans Remember Life Before and During World War II.”

The moderator for this panel discussion will be Darcy Paul, a Cupertino Historical Society Board Member.  Panelists will discuss life before WWII in the Valley, life in an internment camp, life as a drafted or enlisted soldier, and how these experiences have shaped modern day lives and experiences.

A second event, “Civil Liberties and the Japanese American Experience” is scheduled for Sunday, November 18, 2012, at Cupertino’s Community Hall from 12:45pm-3:00pm with a program and panel discussion, moderated by Tom Izu, Director of the California History Center at De Anza College. Panelists will discuss and debate the merits of the Japanese Internment experience, and the lessons learned that are applicable to modern life in America.

“I am especially pleased to join forces with the Santa Clara Valley History Collaborative to present these poignant stories, and to reflect on the lessons we can learn from these experiences,” said Izu. “Collectively, we find healing in the process, and valuable lessons for our youth. I hope many families will attend.”

Cupertino Library staff have put together some booklists that interested patrons and program visitors can consult for more information on the theme of “Moving Days: The Japanese American Experience in the Santa Clara Valley.” A Cupertino Library Book Club discussion on “Farewell to Manzanar” by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston  has been selected in conjunction with the program theme, and the Art Display Walls located in the Cupertino Library will be dedicated to displaying images related to the theme as further described  on the Cupertino Library Foundation web site.

For further information go to: www.cupertinolibraryfoundation.org and visit www.jamsj.org. Click here for the article that ran in the San Jose Mercury News.


Santa Clara Libraries Rewire for Online Era

By Ben Worthen The Wall Street Journal
August 22, 2012

Silicon Valley is among the most-wired places in the country. But residents aren’t abandoning their public libraries. “Kids are still coming to the library to do homework and people are still checking out books,” says Nancy Howe, acting county librarian for the Santa Clara County Library District. She adds, though: “One thing about being in Silicon Valley is that it challenges us to adapt more quickly to technology.” A young patron checks out materials at the library.

The library system has taken steps to reinvent itself for the Internet age.It offers online databases on a range of topics, such as academic articles, Chinese-language books and practice SAT and civil-service exams. Members are allowed to download three music files a week.

Staffers are also available to help people look up things online, such as health information. Moreover, the library system, which has branches in seven Santa Clara County cities, has a growing number of digital resources that can be checked out. And people are: In 2012, members checked out 74,691 ebooks and e-audio books, up from 2,839 in 2008. Read more…


Cupertino Library Event The Muslim Next Door and The Butterfly Mosque

March 5, 2012 By Donna Austin The C – Cupertino News Pearl Cheng school board and G. Willow Wilson author Butterfly Mosque The Silicon Valley Reads Event at the Cupertino Library featured the book The Muslim Next Door, by author Sumbul Ali-Karamali, and The Butterfly Mosque, by author, G. Willow Wilson.

This reading and book signing was sponsored by the Cupertino Library Foundation. www.cupertinolibraryfoundation.org De Anza College President Brian Murphy conducted an onstage interview with the authors about their experiences as American Muslim women. Questions were taken from the audience and a lively discussion about their customs and beliefs and culture ensued.

Everyone enjoyed being part of this Silicon Valley Reads program, and a few of those in attendance were Pearl Cheng, Ragini Samjamwara, Bob Adams, Hema Kundargi, Peggy McNutt, Ravi Patek, Barbara Nunes and Dolly Sandoval.

The program also included the announcement of winners of the Cupertino Library Foundation Essay Contest: Yaxuan Li won first prize for the student essay and Irene Haiyun Zhang won first prize in the adult category. Over 140 people attended and enjoyed light refreshments, the cultural exchange and discussion.

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