New Fall Film Series Announced Reviewed by on . Rating: 0

New Fall Film Series Announced

New Fall Film Series Announced

2013 Fall Film Series at the Cupertino Library

Cupertino Library FoundationThe Cupertino Library Foundation is a proud sponsor of the 2013  Fall Film Series at the Cupertino Library.

There will be cinematic thrills and chills, laughter and tears when the Cupertino Public Library presents a new series of lectures devoted to the greatest films from around the world.

In this six week session, filmmaker and historian Mark Larson will be your guide in a showing of the ten most extraordinary, and often overlooked, motion pictures ever made. From the silent era to sound, from black and white to color we will experience films in nearly every genre and from a roster of brilliant international filmmakers.

An in-depth lecture on the making of the films by Mr. Larson and a spirited group discussion will follow every film.

For additional information about the films being shown, please call the Cupertino Library at 408.446.1677 ext. 3310.

“The Best Films Ever Made in the History of Planet Earth – Part One!”

“The Best Films Ever Made in the History of Planet Earth – Part One!” is made up of six sessions. Each session is approximately two and a half hours in length and consists of an opening introduction, a feature film or film clips followed by a group discussion.

 

1. “Where is the Friends Home?” (Iran, 1987)

Wednesday, October 2nd
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: "Where is the Friends Home?"

 

 

2. “The Tall T” (USA, 1957)

Wednesday, October 9th
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: "The Tall T"

 

 

3. “Beauty and the Beast” (France, 1946)

Wednesday, October 16th
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: "Beauty and the Beast"

 

 

4. “Modern Times” (USA, 1936)

Wednesday, October 23rd
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: "The Ladies Man"

 

 

5. Three Short Film and Animation Masterpieces

“The Music Box”, “Duck Amuck”, and “I Walked with a Zombie” (USA, 1932, 1953, 1943)

Wednesday, October 30th
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Note: the next and final class is held on Wednesday, November 13th

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: Three Short Film and Animation Masterpieces: "The Music Box", "Duck Amuck", and "I Walked with a Zombie"

 

 

 

6. “Yi-Yi” (Taiwan, 2000)

Wednesday, November 13th
6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Space is limited to 45 attendees.

Eventbrite - 2013 Fall Film Series: "Yi-Yi"

 

Interact with Mark Larson

Mark Larson will be contributing blog posts throughout the 2013 Film Series at the Cupertino Library.

Share your comments about film on our blog!

Join the film series dialogue on Twittter!

About Mark Larson

Since 1973, Mark Larson has created works for the stage and film. The stage productions have been presented in regional theaters and alternative arts spaces across the United States. His newest theater work – Six Psalms – will premiere at the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. His film work encompasses short subjects, live performance feature films and video installations, all of which focus on man’s relationship with the natural world. A recent film, “Front Lawn” was presented at the Vaasa Wildlife Film Festival in 2012. For the past ten years, Mr. Larson has taught film history courses at Santa Clara University and for the SCU’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Mr. Larson lectured on the films of D.W. Griffith at Stanford University in 2012 and 2013.

The instructor reserves the right to make changes to the list of films to be shown depending on artistic, instructional and other factors.

For additional information about the films being shown, please call the Cupertino Library at 408.446.1677 ext. 3310.

 

 

Comments (1)

  • Eno Schmidt

    Violence and Restraint in “The Tall T”
    Another great movie and outstanding audience analysis afterwards for the viewing of “The Tall T” in the Library’s Story Room. The discussion by the ladies last night about the role of women in the movie and Westerns more generally also got me to thinking about some of Mark’s other comments. I am paraphrasing here of course….Western’s deal with the theme of when is violence necessary and how should it be exercised. The restraint shown by Pat Brennan toward Frank in not immediately killing him at the decisive ending makes me think of current day problems such as how we react to car-jacking, muggings or the terrorists/”rogue states” that place WMD or missiles in children’s schools. Maybe Pat Brennan instead of following the chivalric code of the Western and releasing Frank, should instead have announced he would shoot him in the legs if Frank did not surrender? Anyone else have thoughts on this?

    Reply

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